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Current Research

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Landscape with Animals

The Role of Own-Group Density and Local Social Norms for Ethnic Marital Sorting: Evidence from the UK

This project looks at marriage patterns – who marries whom – in relation to ethnic marital sorting in the UK. This has important implications for long-term ethnic and cultural integration.

 

With Alexander Vickery
 

European Economics Review 2021

Hidden Door

The Dynamics of Domestic Violence: Learning about the Match

This project looks at how victims of domestic abuse navigate their environment; e.g. do women delay having children until they know more about the nature of their partner? Do they “respond” to exposure to abuse by reducing subsequent child-bearing?

 

With Noemi Mantovan and Robert Sauer

The Economic Journal (Accepted - in press)

Abstract Surface

Marriage Market Equilibrium with Matching on Latent Ability: Identification using a Compulsory Schooling Expansion

This project looks at marriage patterns – who marries whom – in particular in relation to educational attainment. This has important implications for inequality and social mobility.

With Jesper Bagger, V Bhaskar and Tanya Wilson

CESifo Working Paper No. 7570

Girl Painting in Art Class

Children’s Social Care and Early Intervention Policy: Evidence from Sure Start

Services to support families with very young children can help reduce the future need to social care; but they can also help identify maltreated children in need of such care.

With Christina Olympiou, Alma Economics

Economica,

2023, Vol 90, issue 359, pages 953-977

Urban

Quantifying Domestic Violence in Times of Crisis

This project looks at a new way of quantifying the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on the incidence of domestic abuse using Google search data in order to bridge the large gap between analysis based on police data and data from charities and helpline providers.

 

With Helmut Rainer and Fabian Siuda

Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence and Children’s Dynamic Skill Accumulation: Evidence from a UK Longitudinal Study

This project quantifies the impact of children’s exposure to domestic abuse on the development trajectories of their cognitive and socio-emotional skills.

 

With Gloria Moroni

Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Volume 36, Issue 4, Winter 2020, Pages 783-815

Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society), 10.12.2021

Works in Progress

Domestic Violence and Women’s Economic Decision-Making

Exposure to intimate partner violence may affect the behavior of victims by affecting their risk- and time-preferences, and/or their cognitive function, with potentially important welfare and policy implications

With Rachel Cassidy, Anaya Dam and Karlijn Morsink  

AEA RCT Registry

On the Early Origins of In-Group Bias: The Role of Peer Group Diversity and Cultural Distance

The formation of in-group out-group bias among young individuals may depend on ethnic peer composition, cultural distance, polarization and fractionalization. This study combines quasi-random variation in peer composition with an incentivized field experiment.

With Gordon Dahl, Christina Felfe, Helmut Rainer, and Thomas Siedler 

Coming soon!

 

Male Lifetime Fertility: Childlessness, Multi-partner Fertility and Investments in Children

Compared to women, a larger proportion of men never have any children in their lives, and a larger proportion of men have multi-partner fertility, with selection on both physical and cognitive traits; this has important implications for the evolution of inequality and of the gene pool.

Coming soon!

 

Light and Shadow

Intimate Partner Violence and Children's Human Capital

We develop a dynamic human capital accumulation model to study how exposure to IPV affects children's joint development of cognitive and non-cognitive skills. We allow for both a direct affect and indirect effects via parental investments and mother's mental health.

With Alexander Vickery and Gloria Moroni

Coming soon

Dan Anderberg

Department of Economics
Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX
United Kingdom

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